Thematic session
Cluster 3:
Knowledge, innovation and education to build a culture of safety and resilience
Lead Agencies:
- United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
- International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC)
- United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
Discussion paper
Panel
Knowledge, Innovation and Education: Building a Culture of Safety and Resilience
Panel Report
Date: 19 January 2005
Time: 12h00-14h00
Venue: Kairaku room
Chair: Mr. Alberto MATURANA Director of the National Emergency Office (ONEMI), Chile.
Rapporteur: Mr. Rajib SHAW, Associate Professor, KU -Kyoto University.
Speakers:
  welcome note
Mr. Koïchiro MATSUURA

Director-General (UNESCO)
  Awareness raising/education on disaster reduction and, environmental protection and sustainable development (tentative)
Ms. Wangari MAATHAI
Nobel peaceprice winner 2004
  Education for effective disaster reduction: part of school culture and curricula?
Honorable Minister Bimalandra NIDHI
Minister of Education from Nepal
  Development learning: role of IT in knowledge management
Mr. Yukio YOSHIMURA

Vice President, The World Bank

Visiting Researcher of National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED)
Mr. Hiroyuki KAMEDA
Professor Emeritus of Kyoto University

Role of pro-active community education/ media in building a culture of disaster resilience, Argentina
Ms. Gloria BRATCHI
Building a culture of resilient communities
Ms. Eva von OELREICH

Director of Disaster Policy, IFRC
  Emergency Services
Mr. Everett RESSLER
UNICEF, Senior Programme Officer  
Programme
 
Session 3.1
Education for sustainable development: towards effective disaster reduction and enhancing human security
Session Report
Date: 20 January 2005
Time: 10h00-12h00
Venue: Ikuta room
Organizer: - UNESCO
- Kyoto University Graduate School of Golbal Environmental Studies (KUGSGES)
- Global Alliance for Disaster Reduction (GADR)
- Global Open Learning Forum on Risk Education (GOLFRE)
- Disaster Reduction Alliance (DRA)
- International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (IIEES)
Objectives

The World Conference on Disaster Reduction (WCDR), at the 10 th year of the Kobe earthquake, is therefore of special significance, which provides an excellent platform to share experiences, expertise, and lessons from different parts of the world. The year 2005 is also the beginning of the United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (2005-2014). It is thus time for taking actions. The thematic session “Education for Sustainable Development: towards effective disaster reduction and enhancing human security”is co-organized by: UNESCO, Kyoto University Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies (KU GSGES), Global Alliance for Disaster Reduction (GADR), Global Open Learning Forum on Risk Education (GOLFRE), Disaster Reduction Alliance (DRA) and International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (IIEES).

The purpose is to review the experiences in the past decade in the field of education, sustainable development, disaster reduction and human security, and suggest future strategies for the next decade. The session is designed to allow for an exchange of experiences and good practices in order to enhance the implementation of education for disaster reduction. It will identify the key issues and analyze the success factors of different initiatives from different parts of the world. Based on these experiences, the session would try to propose an action plan for the next decade on the role of education in disaster reduction, sustainable development and human security.
Agenda:

1. Background and Objectives: Badaoui Rouhban, Rajib Shaw 05 minutes

2. Opening Speech: Walter Erdelen , Assistant Director General, UNESCO 05 minutes

3. Introductory Remarks: Kojiro Irikura, Vice-President, Kyoto University 05 minutes

4. Opening of the Case Study Publication: Walter Erdelen and Hiroyuki Nakahara

5. Challenges of Education for sustainable development:
Honorable Bimalendra Nidhi, Minister of Education, Nepal 15 minutes

6. Panel Discussion 90 minutes

Moderators: Rajib Shaw and Badaoui Rouhban

Panelists (8):
Walter Hays, GADR, USA (Education for professionals in the next decade)
Anshu Sharma, GOLFRE, India (Pro-active risk education, targeting field practitioners)
Seiji Suwa, Maiko High School, Japan (Education in School)
Ryu Fukui, The World Bank (Distance Development Learning and Education)
Richard Yelland, OECD (School Safety Program)
Yoshiaki Kawata, DRA, Japan (Transfer Live Lessons of Catastrophic Disasters)
Gabriella Battaini-Dragoni, Council of Europe (COE perspective on Decade ESD)
Mohsen G. Ashtiany, Iran (Educational aspects of disaster management: post-disaster experiences)

Expected Partnerships

  • Global Open Learning Forum for Risk Education: This is a forum of NGOs, universities and international organizations to bring the professional knowledge to the field practitioners in remote areas. The forum will be up-scaled through conducting training programs, certified courses in the open-university model, and conducting regular meetings and workshops in different regions.
  • Establishment of Transfer Live Lessons Network: This will be a network to share the lessons from past disasters from different parts of the world. This partnership is regarded as the educational opportunity to raise awareness among people and communities. Up-scaling activities will include: web-page, web-based newsletter, meetings and workshops.
Speakers:
Education for professionals in the next decade
Walter Hays
GADR, USA
  Pro-active risk education, targeting field practitioners
Anshu Sharma
GOLFRE, India
  Education in School
Seiji Suwa
Maiko High School
Distance Development Learning and Education
Ryu Fukui
The World Bank
School Safety Program
Richard Yelland
OECD
Transfer Live Lessons of Catastrophic Disasters
Yoshiaki Kawata
DRA, Japan
  COE perspective on Decade ESD
Gabriella Battaini-Dragoni
Council of Europe
Educational aspects of disaster management: post-disaster experiences
Mohsen G. Ashtiany
Iran
 
Session 3.2
Innovations in risk reduction, education for young professionals: field campus and case stations for implementation sciences
Session Report
Date: 21 January 2005
Time: 12h15-14h15
Venue: Kikusui room
Organizer: - Disaster Prevention Research Institute (DPRI)
- International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)
- Japan Society of Natural Disaster Sciences (JSNDS)
Objectives

Background: Challenges of Implementation There is still a large gap between what is known (science and technology as well as people's own self protective knowledge) and what is successfully applied and implemented. This is the challenge of implementation. Disaster risk reduction requires more than scientific advance and even good policy. It requires concrete implementation. Not enough attention has been given to actual, down-to-earth implementation of in the context of daily life and the routine work on institutions. A multi-hazard, multi-level and interdisciplinary approach is necessary for this purpose. Actions should be taken at individual, community, city, province and country level.

Concept of Case Stations and Field Campus

For effective monitoring of disaster management practices on a continuing basis, it is proposed to establish a few Case Stations . This approach is quite different from the conventional case studies, and will document of what has been accomplished during a given period in a given setting with provision for monitoring and assessing the reliability of the findings on a sustained basis. The characteristics of Case Stations are: 1) cross learning, 2) spatial crossing (on geographic locations and exchange programs), 3) learning on adaptive management, and 4) time crossing (in a sustained way). The Case Stations will be connected through global networks, for its effective expansion, as well as in-country (or region) effectiveness. These Case Stations will act as knowledge resources, as well as examples of best practices in the country or region, with specific focus on Implementation. Young professionals and students will explore these Case Stations for their research and development studies ( learning by doing), and thereby will form a Field Campus .
Agenda and Speakers:
(representative of)

Opening and Background: Norio Okada, DPRI
Implementation Science: Chenat Gopalkrishnan, USA
Remarks: Walter Erdelen, Assistant Director General, UNESCO
Moderator: Norio Okada, DPRI
Rapporteur: Rajib Shaw, Charles Scawthorn
Panelists: Joanne Linnerooth-Bayer (IIASA), Shi, Peijun (China), Anshu Sharma (India), Amod Dixit (Nepal), Hiroyuki Kameda (Japan) , Ben Wisner (USA)

Proposed Partnership : A partnership will be established, named as Integrated Disaster Risk Management Nexus ( IDRiM-Nexus), which is the network of networks, or a nexus, consisting of case stations and field campus. DPRI is committed to promote the concept of Case Stations and Field Campus in their future activities through implementation science and adaptive management.
Speakers:

INNOVATIONS IN RISK REDUCTION EDUCATION FOR YOUNG PROFESSIONALS: Field Campus and case Stations for Implementation Sciences
Norio Okada

DPRI
Implementation Science: The Role of Field Campus and Case Stations
Chenat Gopalkrishnan

USA
  Joanne Linnerooth-Bayer
IIASA
Improvement of Integrative Risk Analysis Ability of Young Professionals through Practice
Shi Peijun

China
  Anshu Sharma
India
  Amod Dixit
Nepal
Higher Education and Research Agenda for Implementation
Hiroyuki Kameda

Japan

Reflections on field Experiences

Guardians of the Slopes: ¨Best Practice¨ from Colombia
Ben Wisner

USA
 
Session 3.3
Cultural heritage risk management
Session Report
Date: 19 January 2005
Time: 14h15-16h15
Venue: Kitano room
Organizer: - United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
- International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property (ICCROM)
- Agency for Cultural Affairs of Japan (Bunkacho)
Objectives - To adopt a Declaration which urges Member States to integrate disaster risk reduction into not only with respect to integration of risk preparedness in the management of heritage sites but also in overall risk reduction / disaster management strategies / policies at regional, national and local levels .  The adopted Declaration will be integrated in the outcome documents of the World Conference on Disaster Reduction.

- This meeting will bring together experts to discuss the strategy and areas of international cooperation based on case studies, with a view to adopt a Declaration which urges Member States to integrate disaster risk reduction into not only with respect to integration of risk preparedness in the management of heritage sites but also in overall risk reduction / disaster management strategies / policies at regional, national and local levels . The adopted Declaration will be communicated to the Intergovernmental Segment of the Conference, and reflected in the outcome documents of the Conference.
Agenda - Opening
- Keynote presentation of the organizers
- Presentation and discussions among experts
- Conclusions (adoption of a Declaration)
- Representative from the UNESCO
- Joseph King, Acting Unit Director Heritage Settlements Unit, ICCROMRepresentative from the Agency for Cultural Affairs of Japan
- Dinu Bambaru, Secretary General of ICOMOS (International Council on Monuments and Sites) International (ICOMOS)
- Giovanni Boccardi, Chief, UNESCO World Heritage Centre Asia & Pacific UnitExpert at the Agency for Cultural Affairs of Japan
- Rasool Vatandoust, Director, Research Center for Conservation of Cultural Relics (RCCCR), Iranian Cultural Heritage Organisation (ICHO)
- George Okello Abungu, International Consultant, ICOMOS Africa (Kenya)
- Khalid El Harrouni, ICOMOS Morocco (Morocco)
- Kenzo Toki, ICOMOS Japan (Japan)
- Robyn Riddett, Associate Director, Allom Lovell & Associates, Secretary of the ICOMOS International
Speakers:
  Joseph King
Acting Unit Director Heritage Settlements Unit, ICCROMRepresentative from the Agency for Cultural Affairs of Japan
  Dinu Bambaru
Secretary General of ICOMOS (International Council on Monuments and Sites) International (ICOMOS)
  Giovanni Boccardi
Chief, UNESCO World Heritage Centre Asia & Pacific UnitExpert at the Agency for Cultural Affairs of Japan
  Rasool Vatandoust
Director, Research Center for Conservation of Cultural Relics (RCCCR), Iranian Cultural Heritage Organisation (ICHO)
  George Okello Abungu
International Consultant, ICOMOS Africa (Kenya)
Reducing vulnerability of the cultural heritage by re-discovering and re-evaluating local seismic cultures.
Khalid El Harrouni
ICOMOS Morocco (Morocco)
Protection of Cultural Heritage from Post-earthquake Fire - Present Situation in Japan -
Kenzo Toki
ICOMOS Japan (Japan)

Risk Preparedness policy for Cultural Properties in Japan
Kariya Yuga

Director, Builfing Division, Agency for Cultural Affairs, Government of Japan

Robyn Riddett
Associate Director, Allom Lovell & Associates, Secretary of the ICOMOS International

Bam Citdel
Mehrdad Hejazi Hejazi
CULTURAL HERITAGE RISK MANAGEMENT
Rohit Jigyasu
UNESCO/ ICCROM /Agency for Cultural Affairs of Japan
Risk Management for Cultural Heritage
 
Session 3.4
Creating a Culture of Prevention: Gender Balanced Public Awareness Initiatives
Session Report
Date: 20 January 2005
Time: 15h00-17h00
Venue: Ikuta room
Organizer: - FundaCRID (CRID)
- Save the Children UK
Objectives Main objective of this session is to share innovative experiences related to public awareness, with a focus on gender equity, media and informal education. Best practices examples will include educational games, radio soap operas, interactive information products, participatory community exercises, and other means.
Potential Speakers:

Organizers: Dave Paul Zervaas, FundaCRID/CRID and Ana Maria Bejar, Save the Children
Moderator: Gloria Bratschi
Rapporteur: Xavier Castellaños

Tentative Speakers:
Gender and Disasters resource book
Cheryl Anderson
Gender and Disaster network
Gender and Disaster Risk Reduction in Africa
E.R. Hay
presentation of Feathered Snake - Mayan version of the Riskland Game
Ramiro Batzin
Indigenous Council of Central America
Radio soap opera as a gender balanced tool in raising awareness on disaster risk reduction at the community level
Margarita Villalobos
innovative experiences of community education on risk reduction from Peru
Pedro Ferradas
ITDG
Media's role in getting the message out and raising awareness on disaster reduction, before disaster strikes
Xavier Castellaños
IFRC
“Women for Development” NGO National Survey for Seismic Protection UN Expert on Gender and Disasters
Armine Mikayelyan
President of Women for Development, Armenia
Creating a Culture of a Culture of Prevention Prevention
Madhavi Ariyabandu
Sri Lanka

Experiences from Cuba
Ana Maria Bejar
Save the Children's
 
Session 3.5
Seismic disaster mitigation assurance in the 21st century - how should our societies encounter major earthquakes?
Session Report
Date: 20 January 2005
Time: 12h15-14h15
Venue: Ikuta room
Organizer: - Government of Japan, Cabinet Office
- International Association of Earthquake Engineers (IAEE)
Objectives

Earthquake engineering has made tremendous progress in the last 100 years - a century ago, the cause of earthquakes was not understood, 70 years ago the first engineering measurement of strong ground motion was made, 30 years ago the number of measurements available to the whole world was doubled from 100 to 200 in one earthquake (1971 San Fernando event), and today there are many thousands of such measurements. With this explosion of knowledge, significant technical achievements have been attained in the developed countries; e.g., improvement in seismic design methodology, enhancement of deformation capability of structural members, construction of high-rise buildings, application of seismic isolation and use of vibration control devices. The 1995 Kobe Earthquake taught two lessons - first, as shown by the good performance of modern buildings, that modern advanced engineering can resist great earthquakes, but second, that even in developed countries, upgrading the seismic performance of existing infrastructure is a great need. This latter lesson is even more relevant when earthquake disaster mitigation is considered on a more global basis. For example, the 2003 Bam earthquake disaster, Iran, took the lives of 43,200 people and destroyed 50,000 houses, leaving 90,000 people homeless. This was due to the collapse of adobe houses, whose construction had been prohibited due to its known poor performance in numerous past earthquakes. This situation exists today in many parts of the world, and shows the need for simple easy-to-follow guidelines and efficient methods for rehabilitation of non-engineered construction. Needs for seismic retrofit: Seismic retrofit of existing buildings and infrastructure is a pressing need, for several reasons including that natural resources are limited and that existing structures are part of our cultural heritage. Therefore, we should not scrap seismically vulnerable buildings and construct new buildings - rather we should reuse seismically vulnerable buildings by improving, or retrofitting, their seismic performance. However, while the retrofit of existing buildings has been extensively studied, most studies focused on engineered construction. More efforts are needed to develop the retrofit technology for existing traditional construction. Additionally, the development and dissemination of various technologies, both traditional and innovative, is crucial for the achievement of this goal. Knowledge management and education, a crucial topic of the WCDR, should serve as a vehicle to promote these activities. Thematic Session: Recognizing these needs, the Japan Association of Earthquake Engineering (JAEE) and the International Association of Earthquake Engineering (IAEE) join in hosting a Thematic Session focusing on seismic risk reduction, and dissemination of this information. The focus of the Thematic Session is to present technologies developed for earthquake disaster mitigation, to provide critical evaluation of the technologies, and finally to propose practical methods of upgrading and practical mechanisms of knowledge transfer that can be shared by all earthquake-prone countries throughout the world. This topic is most appropriately addressed by these organizations because it will build on efforts of both: (a) JAEE, in the form of summarizing an international symposium on earthquake engineering which will be held just prior to WCDR to commemorate the tenth anniversary of the 1995 Kobe earthquake (ISEE Kobe 2005); and (b) IAEE, in the form of summarizing for WCDR the many activities IAEE is supporting internationally, regarding the development and dissemination of earthquake technologies for existing buildings and infrastructure. At ISEE Kobe 2005 JAEE will organize an international panel discussion on the retrofitting of existing infrastructure. The panel discussion is to serve as a forum to open this discussion and collect associate views and opinions prior to the proposed session. The resolutions prepared in the panel discussion will be integrated and synthesized for presentation at the Thematic Session. ISEE Kobe 2005 will gather researchers, experts, and engineers who lead the research, development and practice of earthquake engineering and disaster mitigation

IAEE is the umbrella organization for earthquake engineering worldwide, composed of the national earthquake engineering organizations of 56 countries. IAEE has hosted the World Conference on Earthquake Engineering every four years since 1956 - most recently the 14th conference in 2004 with over 2,700 attendees. IAEE has identified broad initiatives for earthquake risk reduction technologies in developing countries, including: 1) Increasing awareness of earthquake disaster mitigation by high level meetings in international and domestic conferences, promotion of design guidelines, recognition of good achievements in earthquake engineering, 2) Development of human resources by granting awards to recognize persons contributing to developing countries, development of leadership in younger generations, new chances for international trainings, promotion of visiting experts, collaboration among research associations and public organizations, 3) Dissemination of information through large scale links among earthquake engineering related websites of new international journals, publishing earthquake engineering books, donation of books to libraries, translation and distribution of seismic design guidelines and so on.

This Thematic Session will provide the quintessential summary of the global earthquake engineering community for delegates to WCDR.
Agenda:

Moderators:
Hideki Hirai (Cabinet Office, Japanese Government),
Hirokazu Iemura (IAEE) and Toshimi Kabeyasawa(JAEE) Keynote reports (12:15-13:20)
Chair: Dr. Hirokazu Iemura (Secretary General of IAEE, Prof., Kyoto University, Japan)
(1) Dr. Luis Esteva (President, International Association for Earthquake Engineering): Roles of IAEE for earthquake disaster mitigation in the 21 st centrury
(2) Dr. Kojiro Irikura (President, Japan Association for Earthquake Engineering): Roles of JAEE for earthquake disaster mitigation in the 21 st centrury
(3) Dr. Tsuneo Katayama (President, World Seismic Safety Initiative): Past and future activities of WSSI for earthquake disaster mitigation
(4) Dr. Polat Gulkan (Next Vice President, International Association for Earthquake Engineering, Professor of Middle East Technical University, Turkey ): New initiatives of IAEE for earthquake disaster mitigation in developing countries.
(5) Dr. Masayoshi Nakashima (International Committee, Japan Association for Earthquake Engineering): Summary of ISEE2005 (International Symposium on Earthquake Engineering Commemorating the Tenth Anniversary of Kobe Earthquake Disaster). Panel Discussion (13:20-14:00)
Chair: Dr. Shunsuke Otani (representing JAEE, Prof. of Chiba University, Japan)
Panelists: Above keynote reporters and,
Dr. Tsuneo Okada (President, Japan Association for Building Disaster Prevention)
Dr. Mohsen Ghafory Ashtiany (Director, International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology, Iran)
Dr. Sheldon Cherry (past President, IAEE, Prof. U. British Columbia, Canada)
Dr. Zifa Wang (representing CAEE, China)
Dr. Kenji Ishihara (Past President, Japan Association for Earthquake Engineering)
Dr. Tatsuo Ohmachi (Board Member, Japan Association for Earthquake Engineering)
Dr. Takaji Kokushou (Board Member, Japan Association for Earthquake Engineering)
Dr. Thomas O'Rourke (President, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, USA)
Dr. Craig Comartin (Next President, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, USA)
Dr. Susumi Iai (Convener, Subcommittee 3, ISO-TC98)
Dr. Toshimi Kabeyasawa (International Committee, Japan Association for Earthquake Engineering)

Resolution (14:00-14:15)
Chair: Dr. Masayoshi Nakashima

Speakers:
Recent Earthquake Damage of the World and Technical Progress
Luis Esteva
President of IAEE
  New Initiatives of IAEE for Assisting Developing Countries
Polat Gülkan

Vice Predsident of IAEE
Objectives and Activities of World Seismic Safety Initiatives
Tsuneo Katayama
President Elect of IAEE

Importance of Hazard and Risk Assesment
Kojirou Irikura
President of JAEE
Resolutions from ISEE 2005 Kobe in Awaji
Masayoshi Nakasima
Director of E-Defense
 
Session 3.6
Implementation strategies for application of research and development on disaster reduction
Session Report
Date: 21 January 2005
Time: 10h00-12h00
Venue: Kikusui room
Organizer: - Ministry of Education, Sports, Culture, Science and Technology (MEXT), Government of Japan
In cooperation with:
- National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, Japan (NIED)
- World Seismic Safety Initiative (WSSI)
- International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)
- United Nations Education, Science and Culture Organization (UNESCO)
- The Regional Disaster Information Centre, Latin America and the Caribbean (CRID)
Objectives

The Session will focus on how to effectively bring results of R and D on disaster reduction into practice. It will be emphasized that "Implementation Strategy"; and "Stakeholder Involvement" should be incorporated in R and D planning and activities. Discussion will be conducted on how to realize these concepts in R and D, innovate research communities, and enhance relevant science policies. Development of implementation oriented disaster reduction technologies is also proposed as a practical action. On this basis, strategic orientations will be clarified for effective international collaboration in disaster reduction R and D.

The outcome of the session will be:
- Guidelines for implementation oriented R and D policy and planning
- Catalogue of knowledge and technologies for disaster reduction (a first step)
- Proposal for development of a strategic roadmap by combining contributions from member countries
- Proposal for inter-governmental policy meetings
Agenda:

Agenda1

  • Highlight best practice and roadmap to future collaborationHighlight pertinent activities. Identify common recognition and specific challenges.
  • Develop a roadmap on proposed actions and international collaboration.

Agenda 2

  • List useful and implementation-oriented disaster reduction technologies Proposal for compilation of R and D outputs incorporating implementation strategies.
  • Japanese list will be presented as a typical contribution (MEXT Working Group).
Discussion for developing a World List.
Speakers:

Chair: Tsuneo Katayama (NIED)
Message to the Session: Walter Erdelen (UNESCO)
Best Practice Presentations:
1) Hiroyuki Kameda (NIED), 2) Haresh Shah (WSSI), and 3) Joanne Bayer ( IIASA)
Disaster Reduction Technology List on Implementation Strategies
1) Takayuki Nakamura(MEXT), and 2) Hiroshi Arai (EDM-NIED)
Panel Discussion:
Moderator: Hiroyuki Kameda (NIED)
Rapporteur: Rajib Shaw (Kyoto University)
Panelists:
Wang Zhenyao ( Ministry of Civil Affairs, GofChina), 2), Lourdes C. Fernando (Mayor of Marikina City, Philippines) and 3) Dave Zervaas (CRID)

To Push for Wider Application and Dissemination of Information Technology in Line with Practical Needs in Disaster Reduction
Wang Zhenyao
Ministry of Civil Affairs, GofChina
Development of Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation Technologies and their Integration to the Asia-Pacific Region
Hiroyuki Kameda
NIED
Contents of Disaster Reduction Technology List
Hiroshi Arai
EDM-NIED
Disaster Reduction Technology List on Implementation Strategies
Takayuki Nakamura

MEXT
Stakeholder Processes to Promote Implementation
Joanne Bayer

IIASA
Marikina Safety Program
Lourdes C. Fernando
Mayor of Marikina City, Philippines
Some examples of socializing research and expertise in Central America
Dave Zervaas
CRID
Gap Between Knowledge and Practice - The Information Pipeline is Clogged
Haresh C. Shah
RMS Inc.
Conveners :

Takayuki Nakamura, MEXT ( [email protected]) and Hiroyuki Kameda, NIED ( [email protected])

 
Session 3.7
Cost-benefit analysis for disaster risk management
Session Report
Date: 18 January 2005
Time: 13h00-15h00
Venue: Ikuta room
Organizer: - German Committee for Disaster Reduction (DKKV)
- German Agency for Technical Cooperation (GTZ)
Language: English, Spanish
Objectives

Background: Investment in disaster risk management (DRM) shows comparatively high returns at micro, meso and macro level. The negative direct impacts of disasters (destruction, damage, loss) and their indirect effects and consequences, e.g. discontinuity of production, poor services, vulnerability, protracted relief, and conflicts could be drastically reduced through measures of mitigation, prevention and risk transfer. To investigate the cost benefit ratio of disaster risk management measures the GTZ is now elaboration a methodology that can serve projects as a guideline of how to elaborate a cost benefit analysis . The implementation is checked on the field in Peru and in Indonesia where different mitigation measures are under evaluation. Objective of the GTZ-contribution: Presentation and discussion of the methodological approach, the experiences and findings concerning the application of the tool "cost benefit analysis" for disaster risk management in developing countries.

Contribution to the WCDR:

Economic efficiency and allocation of resources towards Disaster Risk Management are critical issues of the Conference. The tool tightly knit to these points is the cost benefit analysis. With this instrument the cost benefit ratio of different disaster mitigation options can be assessed to identify the most efficient option. By analysing where the costs and benefits occur it is also possible to identify the suitable allocation of resources.
Agenda: Content/Structure of the GTZ contribution:
  • Presentation of the methodological background of cost benefit analysis in the context of disaster risk management:
    • Scope/options Limitations
    • Preconditions
  • Presentation of 2 project examples: Peru and Indonesia

Lessons learnt, recommendations and discussion

Speakers of GTZ-contribution:

Speakers

Mr. Reinhard Mechler

International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

Austria

methodological introduction of cost benefit analysis for disaster risk management

Milton van Hesse

Ministry of Finance

Peru

record from the Peruvian point of view

Mr. Sugeng

Triutomo

Head of the Natural Hazard Management Office in the National Coordination Board for Disaster Management (BAKORNAS PBP), in the Ministry of Social Welfare

Indonesia

record from the Indonesian point of view

Charlotte Benson

ProVention Consortium

(United Kingdom)

study "Measuring Mitigation: Methodologies for Assessing Natural Hazard Risks and the Net Benefits of Mitigation - A Scoping Study" (J. Twigg and Ch. Benson)

Partners:

  • International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Austria
  • ProVention

The outcomes of the session are:

  • Presentation and recomendations for the usage of CBA as tools to promote efficient DRM investment (Action Plan)
  • Create partnerships with and between actual and future applicants to develop good practices of CBA on DRM.

    Mr. Sugeng
    Head of the Natural Hazard Management Office in the National Coordination Board for Disaster Management (BAKORNAS PBP), in the Ministry of Social Welfare

    Costs-Benefit Analysis for natural disaster management: methodological background
    Mr. Reinhard Mechler
    International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

    Snip & Risk handling
    Milton van Hesse
    Ministry of Finance
    Measuring Mitigation: Methodologies for Assessing Natural Hazard Risks and the Net Benefits of Mitigation
    Charlotte Benson
    ProVention Consortium



 
Session 3.8
New international initiatives for research and risk mitigation in floods (IFI) and landslides (IPL)
Session Report
Date: 19 January 2005
Time: 16h30-18h30
Venue: Kitano room
Organizer: - United Nations Education, Science and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
- World Meteorological Organization (WMO)
- Food and Agriculture Organizations (FAO)
- Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), Japan
- United Nations University (UNU)
- Kyoto University (KU)
- Public Works Research Institute (PWRI)
- International Consortium on Landslides (ICL)
- International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS)
Objectives

The objectives of the session are:

  • to launch an international flood initiative as an interagency effort, which originally started as the Joint UNESCO/WMO Flood Initiative (JUWFI). The initiative aims at promoting research, training and capacity building, information networking and technical assistance against flood-related disasters to develop the International Programme on Landslides (IPL) coordinated by the International Consortium on Landslides (ICL) which was founded with the support of UNESCO, WMO, FAO, UN/ISDR and MEXT in 2002. IPL aims at promoting research, capacity building, awareness raising, information networking and technical assistance against landslide-induced disasters
  • to strengthen within the framework of the ISDR research cooperation for earth system risk analysis and sustainable disaster management by discussing a new Memorandum of Understanding as additional international platforms to improve the collaboration between United Nations, national and international entities or organizations to this end.

A brief overview of the subjects being addressed:

The concept, background, and action plan of a new international flood initiative to improve and develop risk management measures against increasing flood-related disasters will be addressed in detail by the participants. An international centre for water hazard and risk management (CHARM) which will be established as a global facility responsible for the initiative in Tsukuba, Japan, in autumn 2005 will be also introduced.

The concept, background, on-going and planned projects of the International Programme on Landslides (IPL) for landslide risk reduction and protection of cultural and natural heritage will be presented. Based on a MoU on cooperation on landslide research, signed in 1999 between UNESCO and DPRI/KU, a new Memorandum of Understanding will be proposed to create - within the framework of the ISDR - platforms for earth system risk analysis and sustainable disaster management targeting landslides, floods, and other disasters.
Agenda:

Chair: Mr. Hans van Ginkel (UNU, UN Under-Secretary general)
Moderator: Mr Andras Szollosi-Nagy (UNESCO)

1.Opening Remarks: (25 min)
Mr.Koichiro Matsuura (UNESCO)
Mr.Michel Jarraud (WMO)
Mr.Salvano Briceno (UN/ISDR)
Mr. Kazuya Inoue (Kyoto University)
Mr Tadahiko Sakamoto (PWRI)

2. Presentation on IFI: (30 min)
Mr Slobodan Simonovic (Western Ontario University)
Mr Akira Terakawa (PWRI)
Mr Kuniyoshi Takeuchi (IAHS)

3. Presentation on IPL: (30 min)
Mr. Badaoui Rouhban (UNESCO)
Mr. Peter Lyttle (USGS)
Mr. Kyoji Sassa (DPRI/KU and ICL)

4. Discussion (35 min)
Comment from Mr. Wolfgang Eder followed by discussion

the International Centre for Water Hazard and Risk Management under the auspices of UNESCO
IAHS Decade of Predictions Decade of Predictions in Ungaged Basins (PUB)
Mr Kuniyoshi Takeuchi

IAHS
Outline of the International Programme on Landslides (IPL) and US Government and USGS Contribution for IPL
Mr. Peter Lyttle

USGS
Integrated Flood Risk Management - role of CHARM -
Mr Akira Terakawa

PWRI
International Flood Initiative/Program: Time for Action
Mr Slobodan Simonovic

Western Ontario University
 
Session 3.9
Supporting community resilience is the key to reducing disaster impact
Session Report
Date: 20 January 2005
Time: 17h15-19h15
Venue: Ikuta room
Organizer: - International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (Moderator Mr. Jonathan Walter, Editor World Disaster Report)
- Red Cross and Red Crescent National Societies and their local partners (Presenter: Vietnam RC Mr. Ha Ngyuen Hung, Philippines RC Mr. Danila Atienzo, Kenya RC Mary Kuria)
- Groots International, Huairou Commission and Comte de Emergencia Garifuna, Honduras (Presenter: Ms. Suzanne Shende)
- Disaster Mitigation Institute (Presenter: Mr. Mihir Bhatt)
- Deccan Development Society (Presenter: Mr. Satheesh Periyapatna)
Objectives - Greater understanding of what enables people to cope with, recover from and adapt to the risks they face
- Increased commitment to build our responses on the communities own priorities, knowledge and resources
- Scale up community responses by creating new coalitions with governments and advocating changes in policy and practice at all levels
- Make concrete recommendations - specific initiatives or partnerships

The resilience and capacity of disaster-affected people to cope with apparently hopeless situations is the main theme of the World Disasters Report 2004, focusing on the lessons learned and key principals which place greater emphasis on assessing and supporting local resilience, rather than focusing only on need and vulnerability. The pro-poor focus of the recent aid policies of most donor governments, and the shift towards identifying and supporting livelihoods, makes it timely to re-explore at the WCDR both the concept of resilience and ways in which outsiders can build on the strengths of at-risk women and men for improved disaster preparedness, mitigation and response. If we, as outsiders, cannot understand these capacities and build on them, then we perpetuate the idea that 'we know best' and that only 'risk'; matters. We thereby ignore the most important resource that currently exists in managing disasters and risks: people's own strategies to cope and adapt. Understanding and enhancing local resilience to risks is a responsibility for all actors in the aid community. It is not a question of leaving it to either humanitarian or development agencies. Rather, it is about a people-centred, developmental way of working - in relief, in recovery, disaster risk reduction or in development. The session will draw from case studies on:
1. Multi-dimensional resilience - ie. not focusing on a single hazard, but covering various hazards
2. Livelihoods aspects as well as traditional disaster preparedness
3. Role and empowerment of women
4. Role of local people - knowledge and culture
5. Possibility or reality of scaling up Six key conclusions - relevant for local, national and international actors will be drawn from during the session:

1. Systematic assessment of what enables people to cope with, recover from and adapt to various risks and adversities (risks and disasters) - at household and community level - is badly needed.
2. Strengthening social capital should be the key objective of all disaster interventions, whether in relief, recovery or risk reduction - rather than a by-product.
3. People-centred approaches to development provide models that can improve humanitarian aid and disaster risk management.
4. New institutional strategies and cross-sectoral coalitions are required to boost the resilience of local livelihoods in the face of multi-dimensional risks.
5. Good governance is essential to create the environment in which more resilient communities can thrive.

Outputs/activities:

- Give testimony/account from "Focus on Resilience" World Disaster Report 2004 (with participation of civil society/CBO groups involved and others) drawing out lessons learned and good practice
- Key Principals and actions for government and international organizations on disaster resilience
- Greater recognition by government and international organizations on the role community based/civil society organizations can play in facilitating disaster resilient communities

Agenda:

- Part One: Presentations (60 mins)
Moderator presents overview of 6 case studies and key findings (12 mins)
6 Participating panelist present their own accounts (8 mins each - total 48mins)
Reflection (15 mins to review finding and key questions captured ahead of conference)

- Part Two: Panel discussion and debate mediated (45 mins)
Discussion of key questions above (what can governments and international organizations do to enhance community resilience) and presenting preliminary responses garnered and discussion with audience and panel.

- Conclusion/wrap up - Moderator tries to capture what the discussion session has added to what we already captured.

IFRC - World Disaster Report
IFRC - Action points for international actions
IFRC - Bangladesh
IFRC - French
IFRC - Honduras
IFRC - India
IFRC - Philippines
IFRC - Vietnam
 
Session 3.10
Capacity building and disaster reduction
Session Report
Date: 21 January 2005
Time: 14h30-16h30
Venue: Kikusui room
Organizer: - World Health Organization (WHO)
- Centre for Health Development (WHO Kobe Centre)
- WHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific (WPRO)
- United Nations Disaster Management Training Programme (DMTP)
- United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
Objectives:

- To review programmes, interventions and actions that have been initiated and completed in the area of capacity building for disaster reduction;
- To identify health challenges and issues, needs, actions and steps on disaster reduction and indicators for monitoring and evaluating capacity building for disaster reduction 2005-2015;
- To provide a brief historical overview of the DMTP as a UN learning vehicle for disasters;
- To present ideas on a forward looking program concept for DMTP in support of the WCDR follow-up priorities; and
- To elicit comments and suggestions on areas where the DMTP can contribute to and add value to ongoing and projected efforts and programmes for building capacity for disaster risk management and reduction.

Agenda:

- Regional Capacity Building Reports (WHO/AMRO/PAHO/WPRO)
- National Capacity Building Reports (China, Costa Rica, Japan, Philippines, Viet Nam)
- Short overview of DMTP in the context of IDNDR
- Review of significant evolutions in the field of capacity building for disasters field since 1990 and future challenges
- Present and discuss possible future priorities for the DMTP, based on perceived gaps and needs of countries for capacity building.
1. Norms, standards setting and best practices
2. Building national systems and capacity for DRM/DRR training.
3. Information and Resources exchange and dialogue.
4. Tools and Materials Development
5. Support to promote learning linkages between the scientific sector, governments, and learning providers.
6. Capacity enhancement for UN country offices and personnel.

 

14:30 – 14:35
Welcome Remarks

Dr Wilfried Kreisel
 14:36 – 14:41
Regional Capacity Building Report, WHO-WPRO
Dr Arturo M. Pesigan
 14:42 – 14:47
Regional Capacity Building Report, WHO-AMRO/PAHO
Dr Jean Luc Poncelet / Dr Ciro Urgate
 14:48– 14:55
National Capacity Building Report, China
Dr Li Zhipeng
 14:56– 15:03
National Capacity Building Report, Japan
Dr Takashi Ukai
 15:04– 15:11
National Capacity Building Report, Philippines
Dr Carmencita Banatin
 15:12– 15:19
National Capacity Building Report, Viet Nam
Dr Nguyen Huy An
 15:20– 15:27
National Capacity Building Report, Costa Rica
Dr Maria del Rocio Sáenz Madrigal
 15:28– 15:31
Proposed Indicators for Monitoring and Evaluating Capacity Building for Disaster Reduction 2005-2015
Dr Jostacio M. Lapitan
  15:32– 15:45
Open Forum
 
 15:46–16:30
UNDP/BCPR:Disaster Management Training Program
Joanne Burke
Outcomes:
- Background papers on overview of regional and national capacity building strategies and programmes for disaster reduction
- Proposed indicators for monitoring and evaluating capacity building for disaster reduction 2005-2015
- Ideas exchanged on how learning, development and training can help build a culture of resilient communities.
- Guidance provided by Member States, countries and partners on how a global platform such as the DMTP can add value to current and projected future efforts related to Theme 3, namely education, information, public awareness, research, community empowerment.
 
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