Sustainable Development

Sustainable Development and DRR

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development recognizes and reaffirms the urgent need to reduce the risk of disasters.

View Sustainable Development and DRR news on PreventionWeb

There are several ways to perceive disaster risk reduction in the outcome document. The first are direct references to the outcomes of the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction and the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030. The second are where reducing the risk of disasters will be critical to the achievement of a particular goal or target, for example in reducing exposure and vulnerability of the poor to disasters or building resilient infrastructure. The third are goals and targets that are highly relevant to disaster risk reduction, although not explicitly categorized as one of the risk reduction measures.

UNISDR has focused particularly on reducing exposure and vulnerability of the poor to disasters and on the promotion and integration of disaster risk reduction into sustainable development and investment decision-making. Globally, UNISDR coordinates efforts to develop and harmonise relevant indicators for the Sendai Framework, the SDGs and other post-2015 development processes. Nationally, UNISDR works with countries to collect evidence for national disaster loss data bases, which help generate political and social commitment for investment in structural and non-structural measures to build resilience to disasters; to identify underlying drivers of risk; and to support a shift from reactive disaster management to disaster risk management at all levels of society. For example, UNISDR supported the development of public investment planning and strategies in Comoros, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, and the South West Indian Ocean Region.

Disasters can derail hard-earned development plans and progress.

Global average annual loss from disasters is estimated to increase from an annual average of USD 260 billion in 2015 to USD 414 billion by 2030. There has been a sustained rise in the number of climate-related disasters such as storms and floods over the last twenty years and they now count for well over 80% of all disasters linked to natural hazards. Such a large sum of potentially lost capital is not surprising given our experiences of disasters. The impact of economic losses varies greatly at the country level. The bulk of the absolute losses are felt in the USA, Japan and China but as a percentage of GDP losses hit hard on countries at the lower end of the Human Development Index including Mongolia, Haiti, Yemen and Honduras. Small Island Developing States are especially vulnerable: in 2004, Hurricane Ivan cost Grenada an estimated 200% of GDP; and in 2015, preliminary estimates from the government of the Commonwealth of Dominica suggest that Tropical Storm may have cost the island the equivalent of 50% of its GDP. If disaster risks are not reduced then future losses will impact on growth and development. When capital flows into hazard prone areas, it leads to significant increases in the exposure of economic assets. If these trends continue, sustainability is compromised.

The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 adopted on 18 March 2015, and endorsed by the UN General Assembly, was the first of the post-2015 development agreements. The Sendai Framework is the basis for a risk-informed and resilient sustainable development agenda.

Coherence and Mutual Reinforcement

Considerable work will be required to ensure coherence and mutual reinforcement between disaster risk reduction and the post-2015 development agenda, including the Sustainable Development Goals as set down in Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Coherence can be found in several ways including political recognition of the Sendai Framework and the importance of disaster risk reduction in international agreements and instruments; common indicators and reporting mechanisms; and finally in initiatives and partnerships (e.g. early warning systems, insurance measures, and ecosystem management) that can cover implementation of the goals and targets of the post-2015 Development Agenda.

UNISDR advocates for DRR as an instrument for sustainable development

We advocate for the importance and necessity of linking disaster risk reduction with sustainable development initiatives. Our focal point for this area of work is Ms. Elina Palm (palm(at)un.org).

The following are key international initiatives we work with:

UN Sustainable Development Summit 2015

2015 presents a historic and unprecedented opportunity to bring the countries and citizens of the world together to decide and embark on new paths to improve the lives of people everywhere. These decisions will determine the global course of action to end poverty, promote prosperity and well-being for all, protect the environment and address climate change.

Visit the UN Sustainable Development Summit webpage



UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20)

The MDGs, declared by 189 Head of States at the UN Millennium Summit in 2000, reflect a global commitment to the poor worldwide. Reducing disaster risk and increasing resilience to natural hazards in different development sectors can have multiplier effects and accelerate achievement of the MDGs. Learn more about the link between MDGs and DRR from our archive webpage. We are also part of the MDG Task Force of the United Nations Development Group.

Visit our Rio+20 and DRR webpage


Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)

The MDGs, declared by 189 Head of States at the UN Millennium Summit in 2000, reflect a global commitment to the poor worldwide. Reducing disaster risk and increasing resilience to natural hazards in different development sectors can have multiplier effects and accelerate achievement of the MDGs. Learn more about the link between MDGs and DRR from our archive webpage. We are also part of the MDG Task Force of the United Nations Development Group.

Visit the MDG website


Parliamentarians

Political leaders and legislators hold the primary responsibility protecting the lives and livelihoods of their country's citizens from disasters. We organize meetings with parliamentarians to increase their understanding of the links between disasters risk reduction and the MDGs. We also develop advocacy kits to equip members of parliaments with baseline critical priorities and practical steps to make disaster risk reduction an instrument for achieving the MDGs.

Visit our parliamentarian webpage



The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 was adopted at the World Conference in Sendai, Japan The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 was adopted at the World Conference in Sendai, Japan.
  • What We Do What we do - we coordinate.
  • What We Do What we do - we campaign.
  • What We Do What we do - we advocate.
  • What We Do What we do - we inform.

Learn more about What We Do

CONNECT WITH US

See our photos on Flickr Watch our videos on YouTube Follow our Instagram Subscribe to our RSS feed