Local Government Profile

Kristianstad, Sweden  
RoleModel Kristianstad
Size
1,300 sq. km
Population
35,000
Hazard Types
Flood
Name of Mayor
Sten Hermansson, chairman of the city council in Kristianstad
  • Sten Hermansson, chairman of the city council in Kristianstad

  • Hazard and vulnerability profile

  • Frequent accidents in Kristianstad include fires in buildings and housing, fires in open areas and road accidents. These types of accidents in many cases result in injuries, extensive damage with major economic conse-quences. Major flooding of various parts of Kristiansand has occurred and is anticipated to occur in the future. Particular sites, buildings and the city’s critical infrastructure need special protection against disasters due to po-tential material and structural damage and adverse affects to the environ-ment. In addition, protecting the quality drinking water must be a consid-eration even in times of flooding.

    The municipality has several large industries with special risks, including the handling of flammable gas (biogas, LPG) and large, contiguous set-tlements in Kristianstad’s city centre.

  • Disaster Risk Reduction Activities

  • Kristianstad has introduced a new organization to manage the disaster risks. The municipality encourages participation of citizens. There are al-ready municipal emergency services, a department for environmental and planning office all of which considers climate change issues. The munici-pality has been working with integrated risk management since 1995. The group comprises employees from rescue services, emergency prepared-ness and the emergency operations center. There is an emergency pre-paredness coordination officer in the group. The work is continually in progress and easy contact can be made with members of the groups since all representatives communicate and cooperate regularly regarding their diverse areas of responsibility.



    To learn more about the City progress according the 10 Essential, see documentation attached (Nomination Form)

    RoleModel
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  • Role Model in Flood Protection
    • Essential 1

    Kristianstad has introduced a new organization to manage the disaster risks. The municipality encourages participation of citizens. There are al-ready municipal emergency services, a department for environmental and planning office all of which considers climate change issues. The munici-pality has been working with integrated risk management since 1995. The group comprises employees from rescue services, emergency prepared-ness and the emergency operations center. There is an emergency pre-paredness coordination officer in the group. The work is continually in progress and easy contact can be made with members of the groups since all representatives communicate and cooperate regularly regarding their diverse areas of responsibility.

    • Essential 2

    Since Kristianstad is a municipality with flood risk challenges, work continues on a longer term basis with these issues and the municipal governing body has allocated funds in the yearly budget for preventive measures. There is a local budget for risk reduction and mitigation work. There is a specified risk budget of 3,3 million Swedish kronor per year and the budget for flood protection measures is 300 million Swedish kronor for the period of 2002-2015.
    In addition, Kristianstad is one of several Swedish municipalities that has applied for a grant from the former Swedish Rescue Services Agency and now from the Swedish Civil Contingency Agency (MSB) for climate adap-tation measures. The municipalities have received grants in some cases. The municipalities feel that they receive good knowledge-based support from the national authorities involved and that the application process works smoothly.

    • Essential 4

    The municipal offices strive to protect the city's critical infrastructure.
    This is accomplished through a flood management project. But it may need to be complemented to provide a more integrated approach. There is also a flood forecasting system project. As part of the project, water levels are measured at different locations in Kristianstad.

    Several mitigation measures have been taken and are planned. The map shows which year the protective mounds have been constructed. Several pump stations have been installed and more will be constructed in the future.
    Extensive work to protect the city of Kristianstad, began in 2002, when the municipality replaced and supplemented the old embankments and pumping stations. Otherwise, much of the city would be flooded when the water level rises.
    Along the coast, sand dunes have been strengthened. Along parts of the coastline, the beach areas move according to natural processes. Howev-er, on other stretches, the municipality manually replaces the sand that was lost in the beach areas.

    The threat from higher water level has led to building requirements along the coast. There is a minimum level for the ground floor for all buildings which is +3 meters above sea level as a general rule, and +3.3 meters above sea level in areas of higher risk. In areas for example around the River Helge å, the ground floor of new developments should be at least 0.5 m above the highest expected water level. In addition, new buildings and infrastructure are avoided in the risk zone of 0-50 meters from the sea. Wastewater solutions have been reviewed. In areas that may be af-fected by the higher level of the water table, flooding or erosion, new set-tlements and infrastructure are avoided or adaptation is made to the future levels of risk.

    Kristianstad has undertaken extensive work to protect the drinking water for the community. An ongoing project “Vattenrike” aims to build harmony with the natural environment while preserving the cultural aspects such as agricultural production and recreation. The project involves private-public partnerships.

    The municipality cooperates with the Swedish National Food Administra-tion to assure safe drinking water at the local level. The municipality also participates in an inter-disciplinary group for emergency preparedness (drinking water) called VAKA www.slv.se .

    • Essential 5

    Kristianstad Municipality assesses safety in programs and activities for schools and health care.
    Risk analyses are performed in collaboration with responsible authorities, fire prevention work, etc. There is also a reporting system called Flexite on the municipal internal website. On this site incidents, injury, and vandalism can be reported anywhere in the municipality. The reports are compiled and followed-up so that action can be taken to reduce injuries and damage in the municipality. The schools have been a focus since much damage has occurred at these sites, including arson. The municipality has a policy that any type of vandalism or other damage is followed up regardless of size.

    • Essential 6

    Kristianstad applies building codes and good city planning. The city plan-ning work takes into consideration risks. Especially flood risk is assessed at an early stage of city expansion and development. This includes the overall city plan and detailed site plans.

    • Essential 7

    Kristianstad has established training programs for disaster prevention measures targeted at school children and other populations at the local level. The municipality has, for many years, run a school project involving all pupils 2-3 times during their years in elementary school. The project deals primarily with fire and disaster prevention measures. The information the pupils receive can be added or modified based on the needs. Pupils are taught what to do when they hear the warning signal. Self-reliance and survival strategy is the focus. The goal is that children know how to prevent and respond to fires at home, school or elsewhere. Fire staff comes to the schools and provides practical demonstration for classes 2, 5 and 8. The schools stress the children’s responsibility and their own personal liability.

    • Essential 8

    Environmental protection and climate adaptation work for the municipality of Kristianstad is an integral part of all municipal operations. City buses and municipal vehicles run as much as possible on biogas. Heat is generated at a central plant and distributed throughout the city to each individual house. The goal is that the municipality will eventually become free from the use of fossil fuel. For the same reason, consideration is given to increased windpower. It is important that such developments do not adversely affect people's everyday life and housing conditions.

    Biosphere Kristianstad Vattenrike has an important role in increasing knowledge, in particular in conjunction with Kristianstad School of Nature and researchers in universities. Work is ongoing to preserve and make wetlands available to all, including wheelchair or stroller access. Excur-sions and activities are designed so that more people may come closer and can get to know our unique nature. Within the municipality, attention is paid to mitigating environmental damage caused by earlier generations. Large and costly clean-up project are underway.

    Protecting ecosystems can reduce the damage caused by natural events. Climate adaptation measures are taken in Kristianstad. The wetlands pro-ject http://www.vattenriket.kristianstad.se/ is the best example, but the mu-nicipality has a holistic approach to climate adaptation. Based on the natural and cultural values mainly in Ramsar, Kristianstad has worked since 1989 to protect, develop and promote sustainable use of the values. This brings together the work of Biosphere Kristianstad Vattenrike. The work takes place within the framework of activities for Kristianstad Vattenrike that is coordinated by the Biosphere office (part of the mayor’s office). Within the context of the Biosphere Kristianstad Vattenrike the municipality is helping to preserve landscapes, ecosystems, species and biodiversity. An important part is to collect data in the form of surveys and publish the reports. Research is an important part of this program http://www.vattenriket.kristianstad.se/forskning/ .

    Some protective measures against natural hazards are tested for our long coastline. (See the answer to essential number 4.) The municipality is about to finish a plan for climate change adaptation.
    See the attached preliminary Kristianstad’s climate adaptation plan (in Swedish)

    • Essential 9

    Kristianstad has installed a warning system for issuing early warnings in case of eminent threat from natural hazards. The civil protection alarm system (which is controlled and activated by a central rescue dispatch station) is located at sites where the risk level is high. We have our own forecasting system for flood risk http://floodwatch.kristianstad.se/. All schools, large halls and retirement homes are or will be provided with automatic fire alarms.

    Flood Watch Kristianstad http://floodwatch.kristianstad.se is the municipality’s monitoring and forecasting system, a part of preparedness to cope with flooding from the River Helge å. Every day two automatic forecasting of flows and water levels are run for a period of ten days in advance. The projections are made in the morning and at noon. Data is collected every night from six local weather stations in River Helge å catchment and three hydroelectric power plants. Water levels are measured continuously in Kristianstad and Åhus. A 10-day weather prognosis including anticipated sea level rise is calculated by the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI). This is automatically downloaded from a weather station before each forecast is made.

    The final forecast is then created by the programs MIKE 11 and Flood Watch (developed by DHI) based on extensive measurements of the River Helge å characteristics, cross sections, flood areas, etc., and extensive calibration with historically measured precipitation, temperature, water levels, flows, etc. .

    The forecasts are generated automatically, so errors can occur which are not detected directly, because no manual control is done before publica-tion. In times with risk for higher waterlevels the results are checked care-fully. The forecasts are better for medium-and high waterlevels than at low levels. The forecasting system is maintained and controlled with continuous testing and improvements by the municipality's technical management team.

    • Essential 10

    Due to past disaster situations, Kristianstad has worked for many years to improve prevention and mitigation protection. For example, after flooding events, school fires or chemical spills different prevention and mitigation measures are undertaken. Measures have been taken to ensure storm water runs off even in flood condition with 1) simply the closure of storm water drainage or 2) provisional pumping as well as an extensive refur-bishment and enhancement of our fixed pumping stations for storm water.

    All schools either already have or will have within a year, automatic fire alarms in addition to a number of other fire safety measures. Kristianstad’s ice rink has been protected in particular against the emission of ammonia refrigeration plant.

  • patnerships

    Kristianstad Municipality already has good cooperation with the municipality’s local private civil defence league. This organisation will be our partner in the campaign.

  • Disclaimer

  • The documents have been posted as received. The designations employed do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory or area, or of its authorities.

  • Campaign Events

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    • International Society for Integrated Disaster Risk Management…
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